HONEY I’M HOME!! <3 <3

FOUND PURDUE FARMER’S MARKET!! 

Thank goodness I had a class right next to the Farmer’s Market at 2:30 on Thursday!!!  Purdue’s Market is in Centennial Mall between Wetherill Laboratory of Chemistry and Stanley Coulter Hall every Thursday until October 25, 2012 from 11am-3pm!  

I didn’t have much time to browse or I would have been late to class, but there were stations with granolas and organic cereals as well as “locally grown lean meet” (whatever that means these days…organic?? meh.) meats and veggies.  I’ll scope it out more this Thursday!  Hope to see you there! (click pictures to enlarge and read menus!)

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Córdova Recreational Sports Center

 

 

Group X and Learn to Play tours the CREC!!!During week zero, I got to tour the Cordova Recreational Sports Center!  Here are some pics I took!

Yoga studio!!

Group X room that I will be teaching in!!!!

I went into this tour expecting to be dazzled!  And don’t get me wrong- this place is IMPRESSIVE. Like insanely state of the art.  I could tell every last detail was thought over infinity plus one times to make sure it is the best it could be.  But.. it doesn’t look DONE!  I have a queezy feeling in my stomach that it won’t open when it is supposed to.  But look at this place!


Yup, thats a sauna, and the rock climbing wall is SO BIG!  And I don’t think real rock looks as real as this, haha.  Its cray.  I can’t wait for it to open!

 

 

Group X Week Zero!

 
Welcome back workout- Drums Alive!!  Presented by Michelle Whipple (Whip) — so much fun!!!
Week Zero is the week for fitness instructors to prepare for the intense year ahead!  I got re certified in ProBloodBorne Pathogens, CPR/AED, and First-Aid.  I had 2 hour power step session presented by Katie Hake and one hour cardio blast vs. dance mania vs. zumba workshop where I taught a song and we went over the new regulations which are to not use a microphone as much and use non-verbal cues as much as possible as well as teaching facing the participants the whole time as opposed to facing the mirror with them.  These are new to me so I’ve got some practicing to do!!

Next- TURBO KICK MASTER CLASS BY JULIE VORIS

 

Julie Voris is a Powder Blue Area Promotions Director and Presenter. She holds national certifications for group exercise through ACE and AFAA. She teaches at the Fishers YMCA and Yoga Monkey Fitness and trains the Indiana Pacemates Dance Team as well as the Butler University cheer squad. Julie holds multiple group exercise certifications including Schwinn Indoor Cycling, Group Strength Training, Prenatal Exercise, BOSU Strength, Mat Science, and of course, PiYo™ and Turbo Kick®. Julie was the 2007 Presenter of the Year for Powder Blue Productions, part of the first QVC appearance to promote Turbo Jam, and most recently, was a cast member of P90X 2, releasing in fall 2011. Julie’s mission in life is changing lives through fitness, inspiring people to get to their next level personally and professionally, empowering people to believe deeply in themselves, helping people live their healthiest life possible and creating a life of significance through service to others.

Originally from Illinois, Julie graduated from Eastern Illinois University with a bachelor’s degree in English. She taught high school English for several years before joining the fitness industry. Julie and her husband, Jeff, have three daughters. Jeff is the head football coach at Butler University in Indianapolis, IN. Together, they enjoy traveling, college sports of all kinds and the joys (and challenges) of raising three very active girls!

Its been a great week so far!  Today NEW INSTRUCTOR SHIRTS AND A TOUR OF THE NEW BUILDING!! ❤ ❤ !  I’LL BE SURE TO TAKE PICS!!

 

Fuel me for real; for before, and after.

Snapped this out of the latest “Fitness” mag.  This is the reason why vegans get the most out of their workouts!  It’s because we don’t spend all day the next day recovering!  Vegans eat the most fruits and vegetables and fruits and vegetables don’t create cancer causeing free radicals in the body!  Our muscles get what they need to bounce back asap so you can keep building, keep running, and keep living big.  Without the aches and pains!  Seriously!

MISO TASTEY

We all know that healthy “good bacteria” in our intestines is important.  Obviously!, haha No wonder everyones slappin eachother at market basket for that last tub of chiobani greek yogurt… Miso also does the probiotic trick!  And sourcrout, and kombucha, and other naturally fermented foods, (yes even wine, but no.. haha don’t).. I LOVE MISO SOUP HERES WHAT I MADE:

Serves 2:

Blend in blender: (or you could deff mix by hand, but this is what I did)

  • 2 cups hot water
  • 3 Tbs Miso

Pulse with:

  • 1/2 Cup brown rice

Pour into 2 bowls and add any chopped up veggies you can get your hands on!  I did mushrooms, onions, scallions, and even lentil sprouts! DELISH!!!

Raw Chef Certified!

Here, I am standing with Rawbert Reid, owner of Rawbert’s Organic Garden Cafe in Beverly, MA, where I spent a lot of my summer!  Yes, I work there as an employee, but Rawbert also happens to offer a 2 week internship where people come from all over the world to become Raw Vegan Chef Certified.  Through being an employee at the OG, I have met a Korean news anchor, a German model, a Canadian Chef (Sean who I got to work with! He was awesome!) and so many more!  I did the internship and learned the ins and outs of how to make absolutely everything in the resteraunt!  Soaking, sprouting, dehydrating, I am a pro!  Thanks Rawb and Tina! (the sous chef who I worked with)  I better get uncooking! 😉

The 411 on Rawb 🙂

Rawbert’s journey began in 1994, when he was impassioned by the desire to save the life of his 33-year-old sister-in-law Elizabeth to terminal   cancer (she lived 1 1/2 years longer than 2 month diagnosis). It was at this time that Rawbert threw himself deep into the study of holistic medicine, nutrition & digestion, and natural lifestyle & hygiene.

This ultimately led Rawbert to raw foods and the conclusion that a mostly organic, vegan and raw food diet supported a properly alkaline, hydrated and oxygenated body & circulatory system and could easily provide an abundance of living nutrients; vitamins, enzymes, minerals, essential amino acids and fatty acids.

The loss of his sister gave his life a purpose and the information he discovered changed his life from a meat and potatoes tax accountant to a vegetarian health educator.
Prior to founding Organic Garden Cafè, Robert Reid ventured out to serve in more of a teaching capacity.

He conducted recipe classes, held various seminars and produced prolific writings on the Restorative Power of Natural Foods and Holistic Healing.

Eyeing enough of a national shift towards healthy living and eating options, Robert decided to open his restaurant and to apply his culinary abilities to the purpose of proving to people that healthy food can not only provide great physical benefits, but also be both aesthetically appealing and extremely delicious.

The Grand Opening
Organic Garden Café opened to the public on December 22nd, 1999, the winter solstice.

Rawbert always feels the sincerest obligation to site the contributions and support of his
life-long friend, James Pistorio of Lake Tahoe, NV (formerly a MA resident) for his contributions in establishing and continuing this venture.

He is also thankful to raw foods advocate, Robert Yarosh, who also assisted in the initial design of the restaurant.

Robert continues to move forward in his personal campaign to reach more people and bring greater health to a wider audience. The wave starts with a ripple.

Thrive Class 7- FIELD TRIP!

WHOLE FOODS FIELD TRIP!!

 

Dirty Dozen Plus
Buy these organic
1
Apple
Apples
2
Celery
Celery
3
Red Pepper
Sweet bell peppers
4
Peaches
Peaches
5
Strawberries
Strawberries
6
Nectarines
Nectarines
– imported
7
Grapes
Grapes
8
Spinach
Spinach
9
Lettuce
Lettuce
10
Cucumber
Cucumbers
11
Blueberries
Blueberries
– domestic
12
Potatoe
Potatoes
Plus
+
Green Beans
Green beans
+
Kale
Kale/Greens
+ May contain pesticide residues of special concern

 

Clean 15
Lowest in Pesticide
1
Onions
Onions
2
Sweet Corn
Sweet Corn
3
Pineapple
Pineapples
4
Avocado
Avocado
5
Cabbage
Cabbage
6
Peas
Sweet peas
7
Asparagus
Asparagus
8
Mango
Mangoes
9
Eggplant
Eggplant
10
Kiwi
Kiwi
11
Cantelope
Cantaloupe
– domestic
12
Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes
13
Grapefruit
Grapefruit
14
Watermelon
Watermelon
15
Mushrooms
Mushrooms

 

2012-EWGPesticideGuide

a few things I bought:

Thrive Class 8-

Delicious raw vegan sushi rolled by the one and the only Christine Lucas, containing miso, thinly sliced carrot,cucumber, red pepper, avocado, and sun flower sprouts wrapped in raw nori, with a nama shoyu and wasabi mix on the side :At thrive class #8, we went over sea veggies and all their prowess, as well as cleansing, with Tom Lindsley!

Here’s my version!/ (My scrounging out the fridge.. I’ve blogged about nori rolls before- so quick!  And they taste great with anything!)

What are Sea Vegetables?

Sea vegetables are wild ocean plants, or marine algae, enjoyed daily as staple and healing foods in many coastal parts of the world. Small amounts of sea veggies add a rich flavor and enhance the nutritional value of most dishes. These exceptionally vital plants inhabit the fertile, energetic region where ocean meets land; from the very exposed high tide mark to the constantly immersed bottom just below low tide. They inhabit all the world’s oceans.

While there are many species of sea veggies, only a modest number have a history as human food. Sea vegetables are categorized by color group: red (6,000 species), brown (2,000 species), and green (1,200 species.) Popular American sea vegetables are Dulse, Kelp, Alaria, Laver, from the east coast, and Sea Palm from the west coast. Asian varieties include Nori, Hiziki, Arame, Kombu and Wakame. We provide DulseKelpDigitataAlaria , LaverSushi NoriIrish MossSea Lettuce,Rockweed, and Bladderwrack.

Why should I eat sea vegetables? How are they good for me?

Sea vegetables are rich in minerals and trace elements, including calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, iodine, manganese, chromium and more, at levels much greater than those found in land vegetables. Sea veggies also provide vitamins, fiber, enzymes, and high quality protein. Marine phytochemicals found only in sea vegetables have been shown to absorb and eliminate radioactive elements and heavy metal contaminants from our bodies. Other recent research demonstrates the inhibition of tumor formation, reduction of cholesterol, and anti-viral properties of sea vegetables.

How do I include sea vegetables in my diet — is it difficult?

It’s really quite convenient. Simply add small amounts of cut, bite sized pieces to your favorite soups, salads, sandwiches and stir-fries. Each Maine Coast package comes with instructions and recipe suggestions. To get started cooking with sea vegetables, go to the Recipes section and read Basic Prep section for each sea veggie.

Sea vegetables’ strong taste and odor surprise some people. Remember that dried sea vegetables are a highly vital wild food and provide highly concentrated nutrition — a little goes a long way, and most easy Maine Coast recipes use less than one quarter ounce per serving! Sea vegetables are sometimes rinsed or soaked in fresh water before use, but often this is unnecessary. Dulse, for instance, is eaten right out of the bag as a healthy, “salty” snack. We suggest eating a variety of sea vegetables for maximum nutrition and taste.

Where and how do we harvest sea vegetables?

We sustainably harvest native sea vegetables locally from the clear, cold northern Gulf of Maine waters. Experienced harvesters carefully hand gather the sea vegetables from their pristine beds at the peak of nutrition. They are then sun-dried or low temperature air-dried, graded for quality, and monitored for possible herbicide, pesticide, heavy metal, and bacteriological contamination. This is all part of the organic certification process following OCIA Standards for harvesting and handling wild sea vegetables. For more information see The Harvest.

Where can I find recipes?

Recipe suggestions are found on the back of each sea veggie package. You will find a more extensive selection of recipes on our Recipes page of this website. We offer an excellent seaweed cookbook on our Online Store: Sea Vegetable Celebrationis a cookbook and reference book by Shep Erhart, MCSV owner, and noted organic chef Leslie Cerier, containing over 100 vegetarian recipes, plus 40 pages of biological, nutritional and practical info on all your favorite sea vegetables, American and Asian.

How do I store my sea veggies?

Sea veggies, dried vegetables rich in mineral salts, keep well unless subjected to a lot of moisture, heat and/or direct light. They have a shelf life at least 2 years at room temperature in tightly sealed container out of direct light. Recommended storage containers are our re-sealable bags or, for bulk amounts, glass jars with screw top lids. It is not a good idea to rinse sea veggies and store unless you’re going to use in 24-48 hrs or refrigerate.

If sea veggies are stored in conditions of excessive moisture or heat, mold or deterioration may occur which is readily visible as discoloration or smell-able as mushrooms or seafood past their prime. Sea veggies also readily absorb odors, so keep them in a tightly sealed container. Sometimes as plants dry out a whitish powder will appear; this powder consists of precipitated salts and sugars and is safe to eat. You can rinse or use as is.

If your sea veggies dry out, you can rehydrate by putting a piece of lettuce, slice of apple or damp paper towel in the bag and leaving it for a day or two. If kelp or alaria becomes brittle, just lightly sprinkle or soak until rehydrated to your taste. Direct light will bleach the plants over time. This probably has some effect on nutritional quality, although we have done no studies. If a visual inspection doesn’t indicate any problems, the product should be fine to use safely.

To Rinse or Not to Rinse?

Our sea vegetables are sometimes rinsed or soaked in fresh water before use, but often this is unnecessary. Dulse, for instance, is eaten right out of the bag as a healthy, “salty” snack. Kelp is often lightly soaked and rehydrated (it expands!) so it can be cut into attractive shapes and sizes. In any case, a light rinse before use lessens sea vegetables’ salty taste. You will lose some sodium and potassium salts, but very little if any calcium, iron, magnesium, etc. You can save the rinse water for cooking.

You may want to inspect the plants for tiny shells (periwinkles) before use. We do our best but sometimes they hide in the folds. Simply dip the plants in water long enough to unfold them and release any shells.

What about the strong aroma?

Dulse does indeed have a relatively strong odor. With a lot of it around, if it is a smell that you are sensitive to or not used to, it might be a little unpleasant. One reason that it smells so strong is that it’s a highly concentrated, dehydrated food. See “How do I store my Sea Veggies?” (above) As long is there is no mold or other signs or smells of deterioration (caused by being stored too damp and/or warm) the product is fine to eat. Storing in a tightly sealed glass or plastic jar will help keep the odor from permeating the kitchen or pantry.

What about the whitish surface powder?

Don’t worry about the white powdery substance on the surface of stored plants! Sometimes as these plants dry out a whitish powder will appear; this powder consists of precipitated salts and sugars and is safe to eat — you can rinse or use as is. In kelp, the principle sugar is mannitol and the salts are predominantly potassium and sodium. Mannitol is much less “sweet” than fructose, sucrose, glucose or pentose, and even less sweet than complex sugars found in brown rice syrup, yet it still adds a subtle flavor quality. This, along with the high mineral component and the naturally occurring glutamic acid is why kelp makes beans taste so great, cook so quickly and digest so easily.

This whitish powder also appears on dulse sometimes, but not as often. It seems harder to manage the osmotic process in the brown sea weeds (kelp and alaria) than the reds (dulse and laver), perhaps because the brown sea veggies are thicker. While we are more skilled than ever at handling all our sea veggies from harvest to packaging, sea veggies are not processed to the point of total control. This is actually one of their unique selling points: minimally processed whole foods, enzymes intact.

What about Sea Veggies as Raw Foods?

Sea Veggies can contribute a lot to a raw/living foods diet: minerals, enzymes, vitamins, protein, healing fiber, and marine phytochemicals. All Maine Coast sea vegetables except toasted sushi nori sheets and nori flakes are dried under low temp conditions (less than 105°F). Dulse is our most popular vegetable for raw fooders — it is succulent and sort of melts right in your mouth. It is easily cut into salads, added to cold soups, and in the flake, granule, or powder form is easily blended in drinks. All of our Sea Veggies can be eaten uncooked, right out of the bag but are quite chewy and really call for soaking or marinating in vinegar or citrus juice. To our best knowledge, the Japanese sea vegetables arame, hijiki, and wakame are all processed with heat above 105° F. In fact the arame and hijiki are often boiled or blanched. If you are new to sea veggies, we suggest you start out with the small reclosable bags.

How do I use Sea Veggies for Healthy Skin and Hair?

In many Asian nations, beautiful healthy hair and skin and nails are attributed to the regular use of sea veggies in food, soap and shampoo. Exactly how seaweed works on skin and hair is still under investigation, but it is thought that a combination of factors such as the abundance of organic colloidal minerals, particularly calcium, silica, iron and phosphorous; the emulsifying alginates (fibrous material) that cleanse surface toxins, emulsify oils and de-acidify; and the abundance of iodine, amino acids, active enzymes, beta carotenes, B-vitamins, etc.

If you want to experiment, try mixing 1 tsp. of our powdered kelp (Laminaria digitata) with 3/4 cup of warm water, wait about a 1/2 hour until the alginate gels develop fully and strain the remaining particles. The remaining viscous liquid, used as a shampoo or simple hand soap, is cleansing and moisturizing. You can try some whole kelp (or alaria, bladderwrack or evendulse) in your next bath. A cheesecloth bag will keep the seaweed from clogging your drain but will allow it to release its mucilaginous material that is so good for your skin and hair.

For more detailed information, please read our cookbook and resource guide Sea Vegetable Celebration, pp 35-38.

What about sea vegetables as Animal Food?

Most domesticated animals are far from their original diets and need broad-based mineral support just as we do. They may also benefit from this sea vegetable source of chelated, colloidal trace elements as opposed to the inorganic mineral salts that leave a free metal ion in the digestive tract. We receive numerous reports from customers who have successfully fed our sea vegetables to their dogs, cats, fish, hamsters, iguanas, etc. Dog and cat owners claim not only healthier animals but also healthier, fuller coats.

Milled kelp (kelp “meal”) has been fed to cattle, sheep, chickens, and other barnyard animals for decades. For specially formulated seaweed based products designed for domestic animals and for feeding suggestions, try www.4source.com andwww.noamkelp.com. For a more detailed discussion of this general topic, please read our cookbook and resource guide Sea Vegetable Celebration, pp 32-33.

What about sea vegetables as Plant Food?

Sea vegetables have been used worldwide as a source of nourishment for plants by coastal people for centuries. Besides contributing a broad spectrum of abundant minerals, the brown varieties such as kelp and rockweed provide cytokinen, a natural growth accelerator that also increases flowering, intensifies color, and may increase total yield.

In the garden, till in fresh seaweed, mulch with it, or compost it with a good carbon source like grass clippings or hay. For sickly plants or houseplants make “kelp tea” by steeping some dried kelp overnight in enough water to cover and pouring the brown brew on the roots or spray the leaves. A more detailed discussion of growing plants with sea vegetables can be found in our cookbook and resource guide Sea Vegetable Celebration, pp 34-35.

We sell small amounts of dry seaweed not suitable for human consumption but excellent for composting or tilling in the soil. It is $2.25 per pound plus shipping. Contact us info@seaveg.com.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

 

Ya.  Reeses Cups, thats whats up.  I freaking LOVE REESES CUPS. Haha, well I did, but listen to me being 100% honest and wise from experience: after having had these and then going back to an actual reeses cup, the store bought packaged guys are bland and simply unexciting.  When I splurged on the packaged deal, I was quite disappointed!  These are way better!!!  They tickle my fancy in such a complex way- intense flavors from the real chocolate and peanut butter simply don’t compare at all to the jargin tasteless packaged poop!  Go on, see for yourself!

pg. 183 “The Kind Diet” By, Alicia Silverstone ❤

Makes 12

  • 1/2 cup Earth Balance butter (I used coconut butter/oil)
  • 3/4 cup crunchy peanut butter (preferably unsweetened and unsalted)
  • 3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs or 10 graham cracker squares (preferably naturally sweetened or low in sugar, Health Valley makes a good one)
  • 1/4 cup maple sugar or other granulated sweetener (I used a mixture of ground flax and pure maple syrup instead)
  • 1 cup grain-sweetened, nondairy chocolate or carob chips
  • 1/4 cup soy, rice, or nut milk
  • 1/4 cup chopped pecans, almonds, or peanuts (I used chopped pecans and walnuts)
  1. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners. (If You Care makes unbleached liners from recycled paper.) Set aside. (I used mini liners and put them on a plate for bite sized mini cups 🙂
  2. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat.  Stir in the peanut butter, graham cracker crumbs, and maple sugar and mix well.  Remove the mixture from heat.  Evenly divide the mixture, approximately 2 tablespoons per cup, among the muffin cups.
  3. Combine the chocolate and milk in another pan.  Stir over medium heat until the chocolate has melted.  Spoon the chocolate evenly over the peanut butter mixture.  Top with chopped nuts.  Place in the refrigerator to set for at least 2 hours before serving.